Plumbing vent boots can be all plastic, plastic and metal, or even two-piece metal units. Check plastic bases for cracks and metal bases for broken seams. Then examine the rubber boot surrounding the pipe. That can be rotted away or torn, allowing water to work its way into the house along the pipe. With any of these problems, you should buy a new vent boot to replace the old one. But if the nails at the base are missing or pulled free and the boot is in good shape, replace them with the rubber-washered screws used for metal roofing systems. You’ll find them at any home center with the rest of the screws. You’ll have to work neighboring shingles free on both sides. If you don’t have extra shingles, be careful when you remove shingles so they can be reused. Use a flat bar to separate the sealant between the layers. Then you’ll be able to drive the flat bar under the nail heads to pop out the nails.
If you find that drawer slides are bent, rollers are broken or rollers won’t turn even after lubricating, replacement is the best solution. To keep the project simple, buy new slides that are identical (or almost identical) to the old ones. That way, replacement is an easy matter of unscrewing the old and screwing on the new. Remove a drawer track and a cabinet track and take them shopping with you. Learn how to build an under-cabinet drawer here.

There's no national standard or regulation for handymen. Licensing and regulation vary by state. New Jersey, for example, requires handymen who work for a profit to register with the state and carry insurance. California requires handymen to carry a license from the State Contractors License Board to work on any project that exceeds $500 in labor and material costs. Find out before you hire the handyman if he or she has the skills needed to complete your project.


At Schloegel Design Remodel, we have over 38 years of experience as a home remodeling contractor. We specialize in providing professional Handyman and Property Solutions for numerous homeowners in the Kansas City area. Our highly skilled craftsmen are experts in what they do and are more than happy to help you cross things off your list to accomplish your household projects.


So a door knob slammed through the wall after one too many times slamming the door. No need to call your handy contractor. You can easily fix a few holes in your drywall by injecting a setting compound (for smaller holes) or by cutting out the damaged sections and replacing them with new drywall (for larger ones). Check out this handy tutorial for more on repairing holes.

Risk: If your house was built 
before 1994 and still has the original plumbing fixtures, you’re using 
30 to 40 percent more water than 
a comparable new home. Because about 70 percent of the water flowing through the showerhead is hot, 
that means higher heating bills too. A basic showerhead can cost just $15 and could pay for itself in reduced water and heating costs after just one month. Calculate your 
savings at epa.gov/watersense/watersense-calculator.

How to DIY it: A simple cleaning often solves the problem. Start by pulling out the lower dish rack. 
Remove the spray arm and use a thin piece of wire to clean out the holes where water sprays through. Scoop or vacuum out any leftover food 
particles from the filter area, then 
remove the filter screen (above), if possible, and give it a good rinse.

Whether you’re a busy professional or a stay-at-home parent, Handy knows that your time is precious. When you book handyman services through Handy, you can be sure that they’ll show up on time and ready to take care of your handyman tasks as quickly and efficiently as possible. You’ll find them fully equipped and with all the necessary skills to get things done. In the meantime, you can use that time to get some extra work done or take the kids down to the park. Using Handy means that your odd jobs and home repairs get done, while you focus on the important things in life.
How to DIY it: This job can be messy, so protect nearby surfaces by covering them with plastic or cardboard. Spray the springs with garage door lubricant (about 
$7 at home centers). Don’t use oil, grease, or other lubricants. They may be cheaper, or you may have them on hand already, but they won’t work as well and tend to pick up dust and grit—just what you don’t want on moving parts. 
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