Other competitors include online referral services.[10] In addition, some large home centers offer installation services for products such as cabinets and carpet installation.[16] Sometimes homeowners contact a professional service after trying, but failing, to do repair work themselves; in one instance, a Minneapolis homeowner attempted a project but called a technician to finish the project, and the overall cost was substantial.[19]
An estimate was that in 2003, the market for home-maintenance and repair spending was up 14% from 2001 to 2003.[12] Another estimate was that the market in the United States was $126 billion and was increasing by about 4% annually.[10] American homes are aging; one estimate was that in 2007, more than half of all homes are older than 25 years.[12] And, as populations worldwide tend to become older, on average, and since increasingly elderly people will be less inclined and able to maintain their homes, it is likely that demand for handyman services will grow.[original research?][citation needed]
Sussex County Habitat for Humanity offers a Home Repair Program that performs repair services to help low-income homeowners impacted by age, disability and family circumstances reclaim their homes with pride and dignity. Volunteer teams work to improve the condition of homes by painting, landscaping, and performing minor repairs at minimal costs to homeowners who would otherwise be unable to complete home repairs on their own.  In addition, SCHFH now offers home repair and renovation services on a larger scale that aim to alleviate critical health, life and safely issues.  Able-bodied homeowners are asked to work alongside the volunteers in a cooperative effort.
Some see a benefit of franchising as "entrepreneurship under the safety net of a tried-and-true business umbrella"[15] but forecast a 1.2 percent decrease in franchise businesses during the 2008-2009 recession.[15] In 2005, according to a survey released by the Washington-based International Franchise Association showed 909,000 franchised establishments in the United States employing some 11 million people.[15] Franchises offer training, advertising and information technology support, lower procurement costs and access to a network of established operators.[15]
A handyman is not the best option for a large or complicated project that could take a long time to complete and requires the help of multiple workers. You shouldn't turn to a handyman either if you need an emergency service for plumbing, electrical or appliance work, unless the handyman is licensed in that trade. If an unlicensed person does plumbing or electrical work, you have no guarantee that the work has been done to code, which could affect your homeowners insurance policy or any claim related to the work. Use a contractor or specialist for remodeling work, room additions and projects that require heavy-duty equipment or licensed professionals like electricians.
Perhaps the most perplexing repairs facing a home-owner are broken or damaged things. In today's era of built-in obsolescence for many products, it is often more convenient to replace something rather than attempt to repair it. A repairman is faced with the tasks of accurately identifying the problem, then finding the materials, supplies, tools and skills necessary to sufficiently effect the repair. Some things, such as broken windows, appliances or furniture can be carried to a repair shop, but there are many repairs that can be performed easily enough, such as patching holes in plaster and drywall, cleaning stains, repairing cracked windows and their screens, or replacing a broken electrical switch or outlet. Other repairs may have some urgency, such as a broken water pipes, broken doors, latches or windows, or a leaky roof or water tank, and this factor can certainly justify calling for professional help. A home handyman may become adept at dealing with such immediate repairs, to avoid further damage or loss, until a professional can be summoned.
This summer, they decided to paint the frames black, which cost $900. Mr. Sievers, a special-education teacher, and his wife, a doctor, could have done the work themselves, a solution that do-it-yourself enthusiasts would suggest. But the doors face the street, and the couple wanted the end result to look polished. “My dad and my uncle used to always do home repairs and everything used to come out uneven or crooked,” Mr. Sievers said. So he paid a professional.
Everyone has a different skill set, and not everyone was put on this planet with the same aptitude for manual labor. And that’s okay! Whatever your needs, the Handy platform can connect you with the right professionals who won’t be daunted by your task, whatever it might be. Whether you need help with a door that won’t close, a squeaky hinge, drywall repair, or fixing a broken table leg, we’ve got you covered.  You can’t go wrong with Handy—let us connect you with a top-rated handyman with the right skills for your job.
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