In addition to the major tasks like painting, renovations, and replacements, we also do little jobs. Some of these include doorknob repair, bookshelves and built-ins, and hanging pictures and curtains. Other companies won’t perform this work, but we’re happy to do it all for you at a price you can afford. Our services are so inclusive that we’ll be the only ones you need to call whenever something goes amiss in your house.
Everything was simply unforgettable! I responded to an ad for Black Friday Special: name your price for the job with no reasonable offer refused! I emailed the company letting them know I wanted some rotten wood replaced on the window dormer and a ceiling repaired and painted. Mike said he would trust what and wanted and the price of $400.00. The carpenter and the painter arrived early. Mike arrived shortly and went over what needed to be done. I had purchased treated lumber so Mike purchased with receipt the correct wood. The carpenter quickly saw that more rotten wood had to be replaced than anticipated. The carpenter had to do wood cutting to frame and restore the dormer as well as insulate, caulk and prime the untreated wood. Needless to say, the handyman special turned out to be a skillful carpentry job. Mike, nevertheless kept the price at $400.00, which also included the plaster repair for the ceiling as well as painting the entire ceiling. I had been told in the past by two contractors that the ceiling job was complicated. Mike and his painter made the job uncomplicated and the result was simply great!
This summer, they decided to paint the frames black, which cost $900. Mr. Sievers, a special-education teacher, and his wife, a doctor, could have done the work themselves, a solution that do-it-yourself enthusiasts would suggest. But the doors face the street, and the couple wanted the end result to look polished. “My dad and my uncle used to always do home repairs and everything used to come out uneven or crooked,” Mr. Sievers said. So he paid a professional.
A 2018 HomeAdvisor survey found that homeowners underestimated the cost of fixing or updating just about everything in their homes. When it came to interior painting, for example, survey participants estimated the work would cost $734. But the national average is $1,744. One of the few items they overestimated was a new toilet — the average is $370, not $405.
Franchise handyman firms sometimes pitch clients by asking prospective customers about their unresolved "to-do lists".[16] The firm does odd jobs, carpentry, and repairs.[16] Trends such as a "poverty of time" and a "glut of unhandy husbands" has spurred the business.[16] Technicians do a range of services including tile work, painting, and wallpapering.[17] "One firm" charges $88 per hour.[16] The firm targets a work category which full-fledged remodelers and contractors find unprofitable.[16] A consumer was quoted by a reporter explaining the decision to hire one firm: "'I couldn't find anyone to come in and help me because the jobs were too small', said Meg Beck of Huntington, who needed some painting and carpentry done. She turned to one franchise firm and said she liked the fact that the service has well-marked trucks and uniformed technicians and that a dispatcher called with the names of the crew before they showed up."[16] There are indications that these businesses are growing.[16] There are different firms operating.[12][18]

Instead of forking over $5,000-10,000 to replace all of your old windows with brand new ones, consider repairing old windows yourself. With a few hundred dollars in supplies (sand paper, paint, window glaze, etc.), you’ll be prepared to reglaze every window in your house. Though it can be a tad time consuming, you can prioritize the project by room, removing windows one by one to paint, reglaze, and, if necessary, replace any cracked glass. Get started glazing your windows here.
The average single-family homeowner spends around $2,000 a year on maintenance, according to Bankrate.com. That is considerably less than the monthly fees for most condos or co-ops. But even though the monthly outlay for those homeowners might be lower than that of condo or co-op owners, house owners generally are not squirreling away those savings for a rainy day. Nearly half of them have less than $1,000 saved, and a third have nothing saved, according to Liberty Mutual Insurance. So when that sump pump suddenly fails, odds are, we’re scrambling to pay the plumber for a new one.
While you’re at it: If you don’t have a programmable thermostat, consider getting one. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, an Energy Star–rated model can save you about $180 in heating and cooling costs each year. You can buy one for about $40 and install it yourself. It’s a relatively easy job; no rewiring required. On the other hand, these are home improvement projects you should never, ever DIY.
To fix a squeaky floor under carpet, locate the floor joists with a stud finder, then drive in a trim head screw through the carpet, pad and subfloor, and right into the floor joist. Be sure the top inch of the screw doesn’t have threads or the subfloor won’t suck down tight to the joist. We like trim screws because screws with larger heads pull down and pucker the carpet. If that happens, back out the screw and drive it back down. Keep adding screws until the squeak stops. Try these other squeaky floor fixes.
Comment: I need to have two smoke detectors installed, One is in the master bedroom (vaulted ceiling) and one in the basement. I need 4 lights installed in the kitchen (vaulted ceiling). I need the battery replaced in the smoke detector in the living room (vaulted ceiling). Lastly, I would like the light bulbs replaced in 4 ceiling fans. They are in the florida room, living room (vaulted ceiling), master bedroom (vaulted ceiling), and second bedroom.
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