A 2018 HomeAdvisor survey found that homeowners underestimated the cost of fixing or updating just about everything in their homes. When it came to interior painting, for example, survey participants estimated the work would cost $734. But the national average is $1,744. One of the few items they overestimated was a new toilet — the average is $370, not $405.

It is instinctual for homeowners to contact an HVAC tech when they notice irregularities in their cooling or heating system. These irregularities could be a direct result of a dirty or clogged air filter. We encourage homeowners to check their filters and replace if necessary. It’s also beneficial for homeowners with pets, carpet, or for homes near fields or construction zones to have multiple filters for convenient replacement.
How to DIY it: This job can be messy, so protect nearby surfaces by covering them with plastic or cardboard. Spray the springs with garage door lubricant (about 
$7 at home centers). Don’t use oil, grease, or other lubricants. They may be cheaper, or you may have them on hand already, but they won’t work as well and tend to pick up dust and grit—just what you don’t want on moving parts.

This summer, they decided to paint the frames black, which cost $900. Mr. Sievers, a special-education teacher, and his wife, a doctor, could have done the work themselves, a solution that do-it-yourself enthusiasts would suggest. But the doors face the street, and the couple wanted the end result to look polished. “My dad and my uncle used to always do home repairs and everything used to come out uneven or crooked,” Mr. Sievers said. So he paid a professional.


How to DIY it: A simple cleaning often solves the problem. Start by pulling out the lower dish rack. 
Remove the spray arm and use a thin piece of wire to clean out the holes where water sprays through. Scoop or vacuum out any leftover food 
particles from the filter area, then 
remove the filter screen (above), if possible, and give it a good rinse.

Check for cracked housings on plastic roof vents and broken seams on metal ones. You might be tempted to throw caulk at the problem, but that solution won’t last long. There’s really no fix other than replacing the damaged vents. Also look for pulled or missing nails at the base’s bottom edge. Replace them with rubber-washered screws. In most cases, you can remove nails under the shingles on both sides of the vent to pull it free. There will be nails across the top of the vent too. Usually you can also work those loose without removing shingles. Screw the bottom in place with rubber-washered screws. Squeeze out a bead of caulk beneath the shingles on both sides of the vent to hold the shingles down and to add a water barrier. That’s much easier than renailing the shingles.


Tired of listening to those cabinet doors bang shut? Peel-and-stick door and drawer bumpers are the solution. Get a pack of 20 at a home center for a few dollars. Make sure the back of the door is clean so the bumpers will stick, then place one at the top corner and another at the bottom. Plus: Keep your kitchen (and whole house!) clean with these 100 brilliant cleaning hacks.
Everyone has a different skill set, and not everyone was put on this planet with the same aptitude for manual labor. And that’s okay! Whatever your needs, the Handy platform can connect you with the right professionals who won’t be daunted by your task, whatever it might be. Whether you need help with a door that won’t close, a squeaky hinge, drywall repair, or fixing a broken table leg, we’ve got you covered.  You can’t go wrong with Handy—let us connect you with a top-rated handyman with the right skills for your job.
How to DIY it: This job can be messy, so protect nearby surfaces by covering them with plastic or cardboard. Spray the springs with garage door lubricant (about 
$7 at home centers). Don’t use oil, grease, or other lubricants. They may be cheaper, or you may have them on hand already, but they won’t work as well and tend to pick up dust and grit—just what you don’t want on moving parts.

If you have shallow scratches or nicks, hide them with a stain-filled touch-up marker. Dab on the stain and wipe off the excess with a rag. But beware: Scratches can absorb lots of stain and turn darker than the surrounding finish. So start with a marker that’s lighter than your cabinet finish and then switch to a darker shade if needed. For deeper scratches, use a filler pencil, which fills and colors the scratch. Or, try using a walnut to remove scratches in wood!

Comment: I need to have two smoke detectors installed, One is in the master bedroom (vaulted ceiling) and one in the basement. I need 4 lights installed in the kitchen (vaulted ceiling). I need the battery replaced in the smoke detector in the living room (vaulted ceiling). Lastly, I would like the light bulbs replaced in 4 ceiling fans. They are in the florida room, living room (vaulted ceiling), master bedroom (vaulted ceiling), and second bedroom.
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